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Suspect in murder of Amsterdam day care center owner has murdered before

DutchAmsterdam.nl — Nevzat Koyak, the main suspect in the murder of Amsterdam day care center owner Arzu Çakmakçi-Erbas has in the past been convicted in Turkey for murder.

According to the Public Prosecution Service the man escaped a prison camp in the country. The Justice Department says Koyak had also been involved in a violent incident in the Netherlands, claiming he stabbed a man with a stanley knife in a café at Admiraal de Ruijterweg in Amsterdam.

On August 10, 32-year-old Arzu Erbas was attacked as she tried to enter her car after locking her daycare center, Moeders Schoot. She died in hospital later than day of some 20 stab wounds.

The 41-year-old suspect was arrested on August 26.

Police initially thought Koyak and Erbas did not know each other, but investigation has shown that K. drank coffee with Erbas at the daycare center a week before her murder. According to daycare workers it was a ‘grim’ visit.

Koyak, who is also said to have performed some repair work at the daycare center, denies he was involved in Erbas’ murder.

However, the Prosecutor says witnesses have stated that Koyak told people in a café he stabbed a woman, and that he was looking for a car te escape in.

Koyak remains in pre-arrest, but he is not the only suspect in the case.

The Prosecutor suspects that a 31-year-old woman arrested in October encouraged Koyak to commit the murder. Jealousy over an alleged love affair between Erbas and the woman’s husband has been mentioned as a possible motive.

The woman has been released, but she remains a suspect.

The Prosecution Services hopes to finish its investigation into the case within the next three months. — © DutchAmsterdam.nl

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This post was last updated: Dec. 14, 2014