Amsterdam Public Transport Tickets

Public transport in Amsterdam requires the use of an OV-Chipkaart (OV-Chipcard) — a paper or plastic credit card-size ticket with en embedded memory chip designed to be read by ticket readers on board public transport vehicles.

For most tourists, day- or multiple day tickets are the best deal. They entitle you to unlimited travel through Amsterdam – day and night – by tram, bus and metro. Ferries across the river IJ are always free.

Update: 2018 prices + all buses and trams are now cash-free. Buy your Public Transport Day- or Multiple Day Passes online right here.

The I amsterdam City Card – worth it!

The I amsterdam City Card provides lots of free and discounted goodies.

See Amsterdam museums for free, use public transport for free, get a free canal cruise

Customers overwhelmingly agree that the pass provides good value for the money.

New for 2018: the Rijksmuseum is included in the list of ‘Free Entrance’ museums.

Ice skating on Amsterdam canals – Winter of 2018

If the freezing temperatures predicted for this coming week persist, with any luck we’ll be able to ice skate on the canals of Amsterdam. The last time that happened was in February 2012.

The City of Amsterdam maintains an Ice Protocol that details the various steps the Water Authority should take in order to make ice skating possible.

Updated: Tuesday, February 27, 2018: The Ice Protocol has gone into effect!

Amsterdam Light Festival 2018-2019

Amsterdam doesn’t do Christmas well. But it does have the annual Amsterdam Light Festival — a fantastic winter event that combines light, art and — of course — water.

Now in its sixth year, the Amsterdam Light Festival has become a very popular attraction. Last winter it drew 900.000 visitors — 50.000 more than in the year before.

Advance ticket sales promise another record for the 2017-2018 edition.

Amsterdam: City of Bikes

Amsterdam is the City of Bikes — the Bicycle Capital of the World. Tourists marvel at the number of bikes they see, and the way people use them.

Bicycles have in fact become one of Amsterdam’s tourist attractions. There is at least one bike for every one of the 837,000 Amsterdammers.

Currently, 68% of traffic to and from work or school is by bike, and bikes account for 36 percent of all traffic movements in Amsterdam.

Begijnhof – Amsterdam Beguinage

Founded sometime in the 14th century for the Beguines, members of a lay Catholic sisterhood, the Begijnhof is one of Amsterdam’s oldest inner courtyards — and one of the city’s best known landmarks.

Even taking into account the effects of mass tourism, the Begijnhof remains for the most part a haven of peace and tranquility in the busy center of medieval Amsterdam.

Amsterdam court bans beer-bikes

Effective immediately, beer bikes — Moron Movers, as many locals refer to them — have been banned from the center of Amsterdam.

After years of legal wrangling, a court has issued a verdict acknowledging that the City’s restrictions are legal.

Free Amsterdam Walking Tour

Amsterdam is a walkable city. It’s small enough to easily walk to many of its tourist sights and attractions. While most visitors explore the city on their own, many book a Free Amsterdam Walking Tour.

But are those tours really free? If so, what’s the catch?

More importantly: which free tours company may you want to avoid?